Monica is the Founder of The Undivide Project, www.theundivideproject.org

This #BHM — Why Climate and Digital Justice Matter

Monica Sanders

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Climate justice and digital justice are two of the most pressing issues facing African-American communities today. In the face of growing environmental and economic challenges, it is essential that these communities have access to the tools and resources they need to thrive and build a better future.

Justice is a critical component of building climate resilience. Climate resilience refers to the ability of communities to adapt and respond to the impacts of climate change, such as increased frequency and severity of natural disasters, changes in precipitation patterns, and rising sea levels. African-American communities are particularly vulnerable to these impacts, as they are often located in low-lying coastal areas, or in inner-city neighborhoods with limited green space and poor air quality.

Often the term resilience refers to solutions that overburdened peoples develop in the process and historical practice of hyper-exposure to risk. In order to build real resilience in these communities, it is essential that they have access to information and resources that can help them prepare for and respond to the effects of climate change. This includes access to accurate and timely weather information, resources for reducing their exposure to the impacts of climate change, undoing redlining and investment in green infrastructure to help build green, health communities.

Digital equity, on the other hand, refers to the equal access to technology and information for all members of a community. In today’s increasingly digital world, access to technology and the internet is essential for success in education, employment, and personal life. Unfortunately, African-American communities are often left behind in terms of digital access and skills, leading to a persistent digital divide.

To address this issue, it is important to invest in programs and initiatives that provide access to technology and training to underrepresented communities, including African-American communities. This includes providing access to high-speed internet, funding for computer and technology education programs, and support for small businesses to adopt technology and reach new customers.

In conclusion, building resilience to the impacts of climate change and promoting digital equity are essential for the future of African-American communities. By investing in these areas, we can empower these communities to thrive and build a better future for generations to come.

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Monica Sanders

Founder, The Undivide Project (www.theundivideproject.org); Activist-Scholar; Professor@Georgetown; Senior Fellow, Tulane Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy